A Letter to the 25 Year Olds

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Things this year seem a little different, as if we are slowly but surely moving along a scale of continuity, where we’ve moved on from having absolutely no fucking idea what tickles us. We know now what we like to do, but we’re starting to wonder if we can make a living doing yoga on beaches, drinking coco bongos, talking to strangers and then writing about it all.

We feel we have a lot to prove. The pressure of impressing people weighs heavily, because at this age, success seems to be how many people we know, how many countries we have visited, a promising career path, an Instagram feed portraying exotic locations and beautiful people. We feel that we have to make our mark on this world, but there seems to be a wide gaping space between where we are now and where we think we probably should be, or where it would appear everyone else is. Other people have jobs and houses and partners, whereas all we physically have to show for the last few years is a passport full of stamps, and some bodily scars. Everything else, we carry on the inside.

We are still a strange hybrid between adult and child, where we are enticed by the security of these things, by being gainfully employed and going home to a family and a cupboard full of herbs and spices. But our inner child just wants to go home to mother for a night and sleep in a single bed and be brought cups of tea, and forget the big wide scary world of responsibility and “making an impact” that lurks outside. We haven’t yet realised that all of these things that externally represent security are just a facade, something that could crumble at any moment, and that we should just enjoy being young, and wild, and free. Untethered.

We are remarkably selfish, in the sense that 90% of our decisions are based on our own desires and intentions, and we sometimes forget that there’s a world outside of our little bubble of obsessions, of worries, of goals, of wants. We are the centre of our own universe, and surely that will never change?

Our parents are becoming more and more human to us. We are learning that they have strengths and weaknesses and it’s both a relief and a terrifying thing – the people we always believed to be invincible and completely ‘on purpose’ have also been 25 once, and experienced all these very same things, and made mistakes and fumbled through life with ups and downs and tears and triumphs. They created us and it was just a thing that they did as humans, and something we will probably do as well, and they didn’t know what they were doing and we won’t either, and that is just the way it is.

Our 25th birthday was the first time we had this terrifying and enlightening epiphany that it’s just never going to stop, we will simply continue to get older and wrinklier and our lives will constantly evolve and we cannot slow this process, all we can do is be present for it.

We are starting to feel overwhelming empathy for elderly people and small children, because we see ourselves in both. We were a child not long ago, yet old age seems increasingly inevitable as each year ticks past, and we recognise age as a gift, but it doesn’t stop it from feeling scary, like our life has taken on a momentum of its own, and we couldn’t stop it if we tried.

Ten years ago we were 15 and the things we were obsessed with then seem so far away and so insignificant from this ripe old age of 25. The thought of being 35 seems like an age away, and surely once we are there, the things we worry about now will be a distant and hilarious memory. And again, this is both a relief and a sadness.

We equally enjoy big nights in and big nights out, and we seem to ride a wave that ebbs and flows between partying hard and kissing boys to curling up in a blanket and drinking peppermint tea, retiring to bed at 10pm.

We’re still finding our groove in this world. We argue with ourselves, unsure of which voice we should be listening to. We start to feel we fit into a certain category, then we question and over analyse that choice of lifestyle, for we tend to over identify with the opinions and experiences of other people, who live very different lives.  We are still gathering opinions and experiences of our own, so we tend to be more malleable to those of the people we spend the most time with. Soon we will learn to hold our own, and we will probably learn it the hard way.

We thrive off of the depth of our emotions, sometimes feeling so happy that we’re sad, and so sad that we turn to happiness, because the fleeting nature of everything reveals itself, and we are learning to feel everything in its entirety, safe in the knowledge that this too, shall pass.

Love is something we may or may not have experienced, or perhaps we have fallen in love with the idea of a person as a reflection of the kind of person we would like to become.

Perhaps we have not yet experienced heart-aching, time-halting love that takes us out of ourselves and into someone else. We are curious about how that would feel, but we are also terrified, because we know how fickle our own emotions are, let alone anyone else’s. We fear love for its evasiveness, its inevitability, and its unpredictability. We don’t know ourselves when we’re in love, and that scares us, because we barely know ourselves as it is.

We are conscious of eating healthily and keeping ourselves fit, aware that we can’t rely on youthful glow as our primary source of beauty in the long run, so we practice yoga and eat our greens 70% of the time.

We equally love to party, and thoroughly enjoy wild nights because we can relinquish all responsibility then come out the other end with a terrible hangover and a vow to improve ourselves and our lifestyle, and this is how we make progress at age 25. Go wild, then focus. Unravel, then bring it all back to centre. Shake up the snow globe, then let it re-settle in a slightly different formation at the bottom. Still all here, but constantly evolving, moving, changing shape in subtle ways.

Most significantly, at age 25, we think we’re alone in all of this. That life is happening to us most intensely, above anybody else.

Or maybe that’s just me?

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Yoga Lessons from my Grandparents.

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My grandparents are some of the biggest yogis I know, and I don’t believe they’ve ever done an asana class in their lives. They run off these basic, old-fashioned principles of kindness, fairness, a brisk walk in the fresh air and good wholesome food.

Theres something very grounding and eye-opening about spending time with your elders. Something that reminds you that you don’t need too much to be happy, and you don’t have to tell everyone how happy you are in order to validate that happiness.

What fills you up when you feel empty? It may or may not be that $10.99 mystery smoothie purchase from the alternative supermarket that has opened up next to the bikram yoga studio down the street. It’ll more probably be simmering on Nanny’s stove all afternoon, laboured over with love and heady spices and and it probably won’t have high protein chia seeds in it but it will have a good blob of butter and will make you feel like you’re snuggled up in bed on a cold rainy day. What could be better for your sense of comfort and contentment in life?

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Nanny’s House.

I had a conversation with my Poppa about a month ago, sitting in the garden with a mid-morning cuppa, after he caught me doing a headstand in the garden after hanging out the washing.

P: “So… do you do yoga every day then? It must be very good for you!”

R: “Well. Usually I do, yes, but sometimes I do other things that I feel like are more important in that moment. Like going for a walk with my family, or swimming in the sea, or taking a nap mid afternoon then drinking a glass of wine and rolling up my trousers in the back yard to catch some rays. A different kind of yoga. Sometimes I start doing asanas then I just lie face down on my mat and call it savasana.”

P: “Yes, well, you don’t want to be a slave to anything, do you?”

Exactly, Poppa. My sentiments exactly.

Ahh yoga. Bendy, self-accepting, health-embracing, intuitive-moving, universal-loving yoga. Have you noticed a strange dichotomy between what yoga says it is, and what it actually appears to be on your Instagram feed? Teeny little white girl bends into thirds, sips on a juice made from pureed spinach (my family know I love a good spinach beverage, I ain’t no hater) , and scribes underneath “yoga is about progress, not perfection”. Nobody knows what perfection is, but if our perfection looks like her progress, then we start to second guess ourselves.

Shake it off. Stamp on it. Sit on it and squash it with your dimply bottom. This shit is what cheapens the profound impact that yoga can have on our lives.

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Let’s pause for a moment and imagine our grandparents doing a headstand on a beach, sunset glowing in the background, in their high waisted modest one piece swimmers, getting each other to take photos of each other, taking hundreds of shots until they get the perfect one, then getting the photos developed and writing “#yogaholiday” underneath each in the family photo album? Nah. Nope. It was more likely to be a grainy shot of Nanna and Poppa pressing cheeks up against one another, beaming, looking happy and content and in the caption it would say “Holiday at the Caravan”. Keeping it real, since ages ago.

Don’t get me wrong – I love the physical practice of yoga, and everything it brings with it. I’m obsessed with it. It makes me feel incredible, and is the springboard into living yoga in other aspects of my life. That should be all that matters. How it makes you feel, and whether it makes you happy.

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Cheerful, contented, tickled, intoxicated, jolly! Just a selection of the synonyms for “happy”.

Cheerful? Strolling down the street after a lovely morning of doing your favourite yoga poses in your back garden with no bra on and some sweet tunes jamming and nobody caring what you look like or whether you shaved your legs. A little secret with yourself. Beaming to passers-by. You’re a mystery, you, a glowing mystery.

Contented? Happy with this present moment, with what you have, without feeling the need to blast it to your social media gremlins. Like when you leave your phone at home and wander up the hill with your dog to just walk, not take aesthetically pleasing photos, just to think, and you pick up the poop and carry it swinging at your side, feeling like a wonderful, altruistic human. Shit doesn’t get you down.

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Tickled? When you play a game of scrabble and you get a really good word and everyone says wow, you smarty pants, and you smile humbly and cross your hands in your lap and feel both dignified and intelligent in the company of others without asking for their kind words. Quietly pleased with yourself. A little tickle on the inside.

Intoxicated? When you’re a wee bit smashed after spontaneous wine drinking and cheese eating with your hilarious, mismatched, curious friends, new and old, who know you for you in that moment. High on life, high on the present awesomeness, not thinking about the past or the future, only how your fingers are tingly and you feel fabulous, darling, and that energy pumping through your veins comes from the beautiful people and the fun that lies ahead. Drunk in love.

 

 

Jolly? Belly laughs and ugly tears of joy and double chins and bouncing bosoms and slaps on the back and table banging and a good old knees up and red cheeks and joy, falling on your face when you try to go upside down on your mat and just owning it, laughing at yourself. There’s nothing more appealing than a person who doesn’t take it all too seriously. A certain lightness in your step.

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This is yoga. When you are happy in this moment, happy enough that nobody else needs to really know quite how happy. You are powerful butt lifts, radiant cheesy smiles and a swig of ice cold sauvignon blanc on a hot summer’s day.

Nanna and Poppa probably don’t even think about this shit. They just get on with it. Ultimate yogis, with the knowledge of balance, of not comparing your lot in life with another’s, of the importance of a square meal. I’m not idealising the good old days – we all have our fair share of crap in life, but we can learn from them in how to deal with it. When you need some life lessons, leave your phone at home, put on some baggy old trousers and a dorky hat and go help Poppa in the garden picking his raspberries.

Eat every third raspberry and contemplate just how good things are when they taste exactly how they look (red), when they’re unique (with some lumps and bumps) and not trying to be anything other than what they truly are.

Tasty as fuck. That’s you, #yogababes.

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